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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
the way the move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs and map 21 helps to shorten project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster, when we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 based on an innovative -- innovation initiative known as everyday counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with every day that counts. let's hear it for decter menendez and what he has done and what his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's thp. better, faster and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, a big thanks goes to peter rogoff. in the train crash your and 10, peter and i decided that we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety business and thanks to all of h
on that investment? are you benefiting from that? is there enough tax being generated in the economy to offset that and when a disaster occurs are you on the hook for all the infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and isha return on that exposure greater than what your payoff would he? now the taxpayer, the answer unfortunately is too often now. we have subsidized risk to a point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessarily generating revenue or other societal benefits offsetting that risk. now, through the 70s and 80s and early '90s, when a lot of growth was taking place in growing coastal areas and other areas very few storms were occurring. the frequency was down so the illusion was i a pitcher for 3030 years and this never happened. the problem with climate and weather is 30-year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how these systems work. notts talking about any other issues and now we find ourselves in this increased activity and y
the economy collapse. and in classic washington fashion, this is the case with the schoolhouse is on fire and rather than focusing on putting the fire out, everyone in washington runs out to use as much water. the budget deficit is the economy right now. that's the to 50 minute like that but that's the truth. i think it would be great if an organization with strength and integrity of a or b. would stand up and make the point because we're having an entire budget that is basically premised on something that is not true. >> i agree with you. we do have underlying pieces of our economy that need to get fixed. but massive change in spending and we've already cut a trillion dollars over all in spending. we've cut medicare as part of the political their act. we have to be really careful and just solving these problems by cutting spending. .. >> we do it in a way that supports families and the population that we have. >> let me just add to that. i agree with you, but unfortunately, most of the people on social security will be on fixed budgets. and so there's still a danger having out-of-pocket
that the slaves produced for their masters and that made up the core of the southern economy. and only slave labor, only the labor of people who were owned outright by their owners, by landowners who had no right to object, much less to refuse the conditions under which they were compelled to work, only slave labor would cultivate those crops intensively and cheaply enough to yield the tremendous profits that they did. slavery's importance to the southern elite was not simply a matter of dollars and cents. to many masters, as slave owners liked to be called, slavery appeared to be an essential, even an irreplaceable fixture of society. it was inseparable from everything that they knew and loved. it was inseparable from all aspects of what they refer to as their way of life. of course, economically but also socially and culturally. slavery was the unique basis of the particular outlook, the assumptions, the norms, the habits, the relationships to which these masters had become deeply and reflectsively attached -- reflectsively attached. it defined their culture, it shaped their religion, it even sh
and undermine their idealism. if we permit our economy to drift and decline, the vulnerable will suffer most. we must live up to the calling we share. civility is not a tactic or a sentiment. it is the determined choice of trust over cynicism, of community over chaos. and this commitment, if we keep it, is a way to shared accomplishment. america, at its best, is also courageous. our national courage has been clear in times of depression and war, when defending common dangers defined our common good. now we must choose if the example of our fathers and mothers will inspire us or condemn us. we must show courage in a time of blessing by confronting problems instead of passing them on to future generations. together, we will reclaim america's schools, before ignorance and apathy claim more young lives. we will reform social security and medicare, sparing our children from struggles we have the power to prevent. and we will reduce taxes, to recover the momentum of our economy and reward the effort and enterprise of working americans. we will build our defenses beyond challenge, lest weakness invite
've gotten invite after invite. >> two weeks ago i would have said it's quiet this year, the economy, less excitement. and yet in the past four days, i've gotten invitations to things i had no idea were going to happen. things coming out of the woodwork. i don't know what it is. some people are scaling back instead of having big dance parties at night, a lot of corporations are doing brunches. whether that's actually less expensive or whether it's just supposed to look less expensive, i'm not exactly sure. but you are -- >> you think it's about optics. >> perhaps. i mean, that's certainly with the -- having the two official inaugural balls. >> i've seen so much ink about online and print and even on television, about the first lady's haircut. i wonder if this saturday, if people are going into their salons, amy, saying, hey, listen, can i get the -- michelle obama? yeah. >> yeah. >> what do you think? >> yeah, oh, i think so. we've seen the photo. we're going to want to see how the bangs move. that's what we'll be looking for. >> let's see. >> i've got the side sweep. she got the straight
of that. we've got to get back to number one priority of creating jobs and getting this economy turned around. >> the dundee bait given the timing of the newtown shooting has become a big part of what the president wants to accomplish in this term. how devisive do you think it's going to be? >> i hope it's not divisive at all. the idea that we lost 20 precious children hopefully we hear this week from the gun control task force that the democrats have put forth from the wide range of gun rights and supporters and gun control advocates. i think we need to come together as a country as president obama said and say enough. >> thank you so much for being with us this morning. >> thank you very much. >>> president obama said recently that he likes a good party as much as anyone and he's about to get his chance. after the inauguration ceremonies, washington turns into party town. inaugural parties are paid for with the private donations, and big donors expect some presidential face time and possibly some favors in return. and there's no limit on how much they can g
economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> you know, it looks like republicans are up against another wall. but they're not going to be able to get -- they're not going to be able to get, quite frankly, some things they really want, if they're serious, are important. spending issues. but this is -- he's got them again. >> here's the problem with the republican party being owned by extremists on issues not related to the debt. let me tell you something, the president of the united states, it's laughable that he would talk about republicans not being responsible on debt issues when this president has been in the white house since january the 20th, 2009, and he has yet to do anything significant on social security or medicare. he cut medicare, so he could start a new entitlement program. that's not making medicare more solvent. he hasn't done anything to curb the costs of medical expenses, which he said he was going to do. he did nothing. he struck back room
, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said that information about the fu
have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality, access would be at a premium in terms of our ability to be a civil society if we had a single payer health care system. we could generate almost 3 million jobs, which would serve to stimulate the rest of the economy when you are building -- and actually taking care of the people. they know that in washington. viable. -- valuable. they just want to privatize it. i think you all doing a beautiful job -- the nurses appreciate you so deeply. honestly, the progressive caucus, the black caucus -- but one of the things that you said, and i completely agree, is that you have got to push. we have got to treat a movement in this country -- occupy was a moment. it needs to start up and keep going -- it needs to bring millions of people with it. the r
in the economy before he was inaugurated and nobody knew what he was going to do and people said that they should have sent signals. it would have helped the country but it seems like it helped them do a better job waiting. we've two of them for president now and the fiscal crisis and the war going on and everybody is wondering what is going to happen. what advice would you give to mccain or obama of the should do once they are elective or should they wait until they are inaugurated to say what they are going to do? >> the question is if i could repeat, another excellent question. the parallel between lincoln and fdr not doing anything in the four months that they faced the real crisis as compared to the crisis the next president will inevitably face and whether he should be involved. i will say quickly as daniel weinberg knows one of the inspirations for the book was jonathan alter's book on clinton's roosevelt first 100 days with strong sections on the president-elect and i still remember vividly which is the good thing about the book remember building reza on march 2nd or 3rd. you've got to do
resignation as the economy was recovered? all the way back to the french and indian war, a very young george washington was riding very romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally terry fairfax, very attractive, older, sophisticated neighbor. what if washington's letters have become public during the for -- french and and -- ran the french and indian war. not the first and not the worst. patraeus is not the first and not the worst. been there done that. it pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited prostitutes. say it isn't so. but it happens. now, the details on a sketchy. there are not a lot of letters written about this, but here is so we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua speed. he was, perhaps, a dashing and handsome and i guess what you with the ladies as lincoln was allegedly only an awkward and of lucky in romance. he felt sorry for lincoln. invited him to work in his general store. and he did not have a place to stay. he let him stay of stairs of the general store. during their steve was using the services of a professional wo
in washington. for washington, this is a great injection into the economy. host: this is from one of our viewers -- guest: thought the inauguration funding has not changed very much. the best comparison for this year is 2005, the george w. bush second inauguration, $45 million was raised for his committee. security costs there were comparable. there rose fivefold after 9/11. by 2005 they were in the $100 million range. this inauguration, despite hardships, the numbers are staying fairly concept -- fairly constant. host: our first president was sworn in on april 30 in new york city. it has moved back and forth from the east front to other locations on capitol hill. from harry truman through jimmy carter, it was always on the east front of the capital. moved by the congressional committee to the west front in 1985, which is where it remains today. kansas, independent line, good morning. caller: i think it is amazing that we all want to complain about every penny that is spent in washington, d.c., because of the inauguration. this is something special that happens every four years. surely, surely,
to get its act together and get the economy moving. >> the american people also elected another house of representatives, a republican house of representatives, and that is our most direct form of representation in the federal government, the house of representatives, and they're the ones that control the purse strings. we have to do something. this isn't -- the thing is this is not about party politics. this is about the solvency of this country, it is about this country being the greatest nation on earth. it's our greatest threat to our national security. >> some people would say it is about party politics and some people, frankly, blame the tea party for this terrible gridlock in the house of representatives. there's a tea party group in south florida that's going to change its name to not include the tea party because the public reacts so negatively to that title now. >> i think that's because we have been, i mean just given a bad rap. all we're about is fiscal responsibility. we're not about social issues. all we want is washington to live within their means, just like families a
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)